Friday, 22 February 2019

The impossibility of making space


Space on my bookshelves, that is; so much so that I was almost relieved when five of the twenty-seven books I’ve read this year are destined for the charity shop;.

Near-impossible also, to choose a single  ‘winner’ this week. I’m tempted to name Patricia’s ‘Avant-Couriers’ as persuasion to take this further, and there’s three or more jostling for position, but  in the end it came down to Dave T.’s ‘Strange Voodoo and Jim Deegan’s ‘Tomorrow?’. And I simply could not choose between them. Thank you all for taking part and commenting.

Words for next week: gig plough wit

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday, 28th February words and winners posted Friday March 1st

Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 15 February 2019

Hearts flowering scarlet here, no doubt.

But what a flowering of talent this week - every one a winner - and so difficult to choose: John’s trip to Kursaal, Terrie’s hammer-hoisting Atlas,  Jim’s avenging father, Zaiure’s released claws, Patricia’s moody purples and silkscreen T shirt, Antonia’s empty shelves and, finally, Rosie’s cliffhanger ending.. To say nothing of the serials and Dave W’s too late to qualify but good to read.  
In the end, and by the merest wolfish whisker, I chose Zaiure’s ‘After the bath’, and thank you all for the enjoyment.

Words for next week: facsimile knit roll

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday February 21st, words and winners posted Friday 22nd

Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 8 February 2019

From subtle to bright


This week I’ve been struggling with colour, trying – and failing – to get the printed actuality to match the subtlety of greenish-grey I intended. Yesterday I decided to drop subtlety and and spent  several enjoyable hours playing with primary shades. Fingers crossed they’ll come out as intended.

And somehow, although on re-reading there’s no actual mention, Dave W’s ‘Fixed’ put colours in my mind with sufficient strength for me to declare him this week’s winner.

And yet again, I thank you for your contributions, all of which enable me to visit several shades of brightness.

Words for next week: caramel Degas seize

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday February14th, words and winners posted Friday 15th

Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 1 February 2019

Achingly beautiful, near-singing dawns


Is what we’ve had several of this week, sliver of a waning moon west of Venus. But oh so cold, and this morning awakening to a dusting of snow.

There’s been some achingly beautiful, achingly painful and achingly good writing this week too, much appreciated as I’ve been busier than usual  on other projects.  
My choice of winner is Terrie, but I confess I cannot choose between episodes 42 or 43 of her ‘The Secret Armadillo Soldier (SAS) Diaries’ - unfailingly pleasurable and stimulating.

Words for next week: flex peter ravage

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday February 7th, words and winners posted Friday 8th

Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 25 January 2019

So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep (William Blake)


I was reminded of another delicious word this week, but I’m saving that for later. Hopefully this selection will not cause head-scratching and discombobulation, and the birthday boys post their entries  before they begin to celebrate.

But at least it made picking a winner easier: Patricia provided three well-researched pieces, of which my favourite was the succinct ‘Basic Instinct’, and Antonia’s Mad Italian 90 earns second prize. As ever, thank you for the entertainment and for the reading and commenting which ensure this site stays alive and kicking.

Words for next week: brittle orphan sculpture

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday January 31st, words and winners posted Friday 1st February

Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 18 January 2019

Three for the price of one

Which was what John’s ‘The November Wind’ delivered to me this week, no doubt unintentionally. The title had my head veering between ‘November Rain’ and ‘Mandolin Wind’ and then the text delivered ‘The Edmond Fitzgerald’, thus it became this week’s sure fire winner. Not that I want to create a precedent!

I’m also going to mention three others which each delivered a sparely depicted insight into tragedies: David T’ Atlantic Crossing, Bill’s ‘Becalmed and Patricia’s ‘God Speed.

Thank you all - a great and varied week of reading. Look forward to next week’s variations.

Words for next week: ankle fuliginous worry

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday January 24th, words and winners posted Friday 25th
 Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 11 January 2019

Time for a cuddle

Not that I’m fed up with gore and evisceration, mutants, mayhem and cross-dressing, you understand. Just that I’ve had a pig of a day (pdfs, nothing dreadful!) cannot choose between five top tales, and a home for teddy bears feels highly enticing, so this week Antonia takes the podium for the 29th episode of her ever-entertaining  ‘Stop the week I want to get off.’ (For another treat, do check out Rosie’s entry)

I thank you all for the considerable entertainment of your writing, your contributions of well-considered comments, and look forward to seeing what horror you can wreak with these gentle words:

Words for next week: mariner poem rut

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday January 18th, words and winners posted Friday 19th
  Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and uses of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 4 January 2019

Wheels on the road


A fortnight off, much of it very pleasurable, and now to get to grips with a new year and the achieving of one resolution (made for the third year running) to get three much-laboured over novels out into the world and a fourth one finished, to which end I’ve spent several days reading the 360 pages of the first one aloud and am now suffering from a sore throat. 

No shouting needed to pick the first winner of 2019, even though I confess it’s the eighth time I’ve been made to feel slightly nauseous by the vivid nastiness in Jim Deegan’s Conscription series - excellent stuff!

Words for next week: appendix barrage cure

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday January 10th, words and winners posted Friday 11th
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 21 December 2018

To raise a glass


Today being Winter Solstice, and me having been born five minutes too soon to claim myself a ‘child of’ (and more years ago than I envisaged myself reaching) I send you all greetings for the season, however you intend to spend it, and thank you for your contributions to this place over 2018.  It gives me a great deal of pleasure to declare Patricia’s ‘Pierce the veil’ as the final winner of the year, especially when she has contributed – as many of you have – so much to the success of Prediction. Long may it last.

Because of the way the dates fall I’m sure I am not going to be the only one hard-pushed to find time to properly read and appreciate, never mind contribute anything, so you have a fortnight to find a use for the following: 

Words for next week: hedonist saturate wishbone

Entries by midnight (GMT) Thursday January 3rd, words and winners posted Friday 4th
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.


Friday, 14 December 2018

Ragged robins


I thank for your merciful acceptance of last week’s dice-throwing and have given myself a strict talking to about responsibility and not shilly-shallying.  Hasn’t made it any easier, I’m no happier about the ones I ‘discard’ in the interest of naming a winner, despite the very considerable pleasure I – and, judging by the comments, the rest of you – gain from so many of them. Neither am I able to be very analytical as to why; it’s more often than not  just a gut kick.  Without doubt this week, despite roses and patchwork people,  one of the biggest was John’s ‘Ragged breath’ – truly visceral, as Terrie said – and very closely followed by Zaiure’s ‘Poison’. I am grateful for the opportunity to read all of them.

Words for next week: pile solstice vicarious

Entries by Midnight (GMT) Thursday 20th, words and winners posted Friday 21st December
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 7 December 2018

Shock horror! (sort of)

It did come as a bit of a shock to be reminded this time last year I was bed-bound and barely able to walk, thanks to some vicious South African infection. No less of a one was that seven weeks later I walked eleven rough-country miles, although not by choice! This week, I found making a choice from a shortlist of six almost as difficult, not least because I cannot find anything in the way of common qualities to use as criteria.

So what I did was ... throw a dice. And the dice selected, from my list of six equally-merited pieces, Terrie’s 33rd instalment of the SAS Diaries. The other five were David W’s ‘AGAIN’, David T’s ‘Ticks and Crosses’, Bill’s ‘Lips’ and either Patricia’s ‘Things that go bump in the night ’ or ‘Can do’, but I thank you for all of them.

Words for next week: contagion graft mercy
Entries by Midnight (GMT) Thursday 13th, words and winners posted Friday 14th December
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.


Friday, 30 November 2018

Power of poetry


The most recent post in my blog (lines of communication at the top of ‘Other places we like’) refers to a poetry anthology, and specifically to Vicki Feaver. This past week I have been working my way through her ‘The Taste of Blood‘, and time and time again I find myself compelled to read and re-read just for the sparsity of her word use and the visceral kick so many of them give.

David W’s desire to paint with spare strokes echoes this – it is something Prediction certainly helps me achieve – so for that desire, and the gruesomeness of his untitled piece, I  declare him this week’s winner

Words for next week: extraneous indelible wean

Entries by Midnight (GMT) Thursday 6th Words and Winners posted Friday 7th December
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 23 November 2018

Jiggety-jig


Home again - and very sincere thanks to Patricia for a superbly efficient and inspirational manning of the fort while I was away. I’m relieved that my  ‘insurance’ of arranging cover worked insofar as there were no hiccups, transport, health or bike-wise and we had an absolutely brilliant and worry-free month away. Full-on too so I had very little time to read posts in the intervening weeks but have had a high- speed read of this week’s entries and been able – eventually – to pick a winner. Wonderful to re-enter the worlds each of you create – Terrie’s SAS diaries a particular delight – and to see the breadth of creativity and imagination each of you bring – David T’s ‘War of the Farmlands’ notably so – but it was Jerry’s creation of a larger world of potential that eventually won the top spot.

Words for next week: bristle eligible seethe

Entries by Midnight (GMT) Thursday 29th Words and Winners posted Friday 30th November
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 16 November 2018

Welcome Home, Cobber


This may or may not be my last week at The Prediction's helm. Sandra is due back on November 21st but wasn't sure she'd be ready to assume the reins once more immediately. So it is possible that our leader will not be overseeing the domain until the following week (or thereabouts). I hope I've done a reasonable job of keeping the place afloat. My admiration for Sandra's efforts have done nothing but increase with every week that has passed. It's been fun...but I'm deliriously delighted to relinquish my power.

This week, I will not be listing those tales that were in the running for top spot. To do so would be to include every submission put forward. Indeed, this past week was an incredible array of top notch stories and I believe everyone excelled. That being said, I'm sure each of you realize then how difficult it was to select a winner. My choice is in recognition of the ability this writer constantly displays in making what could be the mundane into a delightful slice of day-to-day life in a little shop found on an island located in the English Channel. Congratulations to Antonia for Episode 22 of "Stop The World, I Want To Get Off," but the well-deserved accolade is really in appreciation of this captivating serialization in its entirety thus far.

Words for next week (selected via a random word generator):
Stunning  Maid  Quaint
 
Entries by Midnight (GMT) Thursday 22nd November
Words and Winners posted by Noon (GMT) Friday 23rd November
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.

Friday, 9 November 2018

From Across The Pond


It may or may not be generally known that I originally hail from good old London Towne (and remain a staunch British Citizen). Something that has never failed to surprise me is the success British programming usually garners in the United States. For instance, that Americans even "get" the unique humour that is the Pythons will always escape me and yet, they gained virtual rock star status...and, don't get me wrong, deservedly so. It seems that a British staple known as "Coronation Street" aired its first episode this week in 1960 (on December 7th) and is still going strong. "Corrie" also has a tremendous following this side of the pond. I missed decades of episodes over the years and only recently began to rewatch the world's longest running television soap opera. I caught up in no time and it was as though I'd never missed a beat. Of course, all of this has absolutely nothing to do with this forum or the selection of this week's winner but as I've already pointed out, I am full of such useless information!

And now, for something completely different, the true purpose of this post...declaration of this week's cream of the crop. I would like to say that this does not get any easier. In the end, however, it came down to a duo of really close contenders. And so....top honour to jdeegan for "CONSCRIPTION," a true out-of-the-box entry, with John's "Jailhouse Rock" just pipped at the post, for an insightful glimpse into how even the most famous with all their benefits can find themselves in a place of confinement that brings sadness and longing.

Words for next week (selected via a random word generator):
Perfume  Flicker  Year
 
Entries by Midnight (GMT) Thursday 15th November
Words and Winners posted by Noon (GMT) Friday 16th November
  
Usual rules: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialised fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media you prefer.