Sunday, 16 November 2014

As the crow flies.

Good morning!
It never ceases to amaze me how you all cover such great distances moving your stories forward in just a hundred words, and with prompts that I sometimes worry will present awkward challenges.  And yet each week, you come back with amazingly dark and wonderful tales.  I wanted to take this time to thank you all so much for continuing to play, and for being an incredible inspiration to me, and to each other.

And now on to it!

Our winner this week is Michael B. Fletcher with To Dispel A Myth: First of all, 41 words!  41...words!  Brilliant.  This is a clean, concise, and quietly terrifying read.  I found myself both marveling at the brevity and wishing for more words! Thank you so much for joining us!  Please continue to do so.

In second place this week is Sandra Davies with Weighing Probabilities: I had such a visceral reaction to this story. As mentioned, there's a deep and awkward psychological thing going on for me.  One that makes me wonder if other women share it, and almost frightened to ask. Beneath the peril of being assaulted or trying for the river, there is something much deeper.  Thank you, Sandra!

The Tome obligingly left words, last night, while I was trying to connect to my network.  They're a bit dried up and crisp now, but I believe I can make them out.

Cheat
Brass
Loaf

The usual rules apply: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. Serialized fiction is, as always, welcome. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine.  You have until Friday, November 21st., 11PM EST.  Winners and words will posted by 11PM EST on Saturday November 22nd.

Please feel free to share the doings here at Prediction on your social networks.  New folks are always welcome to play!  Thanks so much!

The Gates Are Open!

51 comments:

  1. Fantastic win, Michael! Knew you could do it... do I not have the really good writers on my team?
    Sandra, brilliant as ever.
    Congratulations both of you!
    The captain is at this moment brooding on the new words. We will see what he has to say later in the week, he said as he walked out. I am getting a lot of spirit visitors lately, he is not that social, someone arrives, he leaves...
    And it rains. Torrents and torrents of it, flooded roads and all. And the weather forecast for this area precisely says 'light rain.' Really?

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  2. Well done Michael, I entirely agree with how very effective your 41 words were. And thank you Colleen - yes indeed my thus far nameless heroine is a complex little madam, but then she IS only sixteen!

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    1. Thank you for your kind words. It's much appreciated. It's great for the positive feedback as a writer needs all he can get :)

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  3. A Goodly Wife

    “You can’t cheat on bread recipes. Either do it right or take your chance it will be awful.”

    My guest wasn’t really listening. She looked at the portraits and the elaborate wood carving of the tree of life. My John did that after the first one come along.

    I pulled out the loaf, crusty, perfect.

    She smiled at me like brass imitating gold. “He didn’t tell me he’s married.”

    “Never does.”

    “You’re much older than him.”

    “Other way around. You’ll see.”

    As John pulled up outside, I handed the latest girl a slice of warm bread. She’d need her strength.

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    1. Vintage Rebecca this! Taunting, intriguing and gets twisty into your head with questions. Love it.

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    2. Like the implications of this one. A nice slice of life.

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    3. Love the last line in this - like creamy butter on fresh bread.

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    4. Definitely vintage Rebecca, clever use of words to build an interesting scenario.

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    5. Old school Rebecca indeed! Lovely treat! Great as a one shot but could actually be a fantastic prologue! Thank you!

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  5. The ultimate question

    Brass-hard knuckles kneaded my back like he meant to make a plaited loaf of me. Grunting, ‘Raven’s piece, eh? I thought him fussier than this!’ he forced me to my knees.
    I saw no escape from what he intended.
    From behind him, Twin One warned, ‘This scraggy bitch is Raven’s reject...’
    Twin Two added, ‘She gave him week-blind black-bloody clap!
    Wart brother dropped me like a hot potato, backed away, aghast.
    I leapt for the flood-speed river as the twins mouthed their apologies. Thanks to them I’d once again cheated a fate some feared worse than death. But for what?

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    1. Where's this one going? Interesting story, obviously part of a much larger one. Like to read more. Good use of the three words.

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    2. Interesting situation building here. And I'm not 100% sure what week-blind black-bloody clap is - but I'm certain it sounds uncomfortable. ;)

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    3. The twists keep coming! I like that the twins were not complicit in the desire for the ill deed, and that our heroine made her escape, even if she knows not to what end. I have to keep reminding myself she's barely out of childhood. Makes it all so much more dire.

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    4. it's all moved up a gear and is action loaded more than usual. Really good instalment.

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    5. Oh! Bloody brilliant twist at the end! Loved your use of the prompts this week! My guess on "week-blind-black-bloody-clap" Well..."bloody clap"...gonorrhoea is called the clap. I won't go into the bloody part. LOL. And "week-blind-black"...a very creative phrasing for the blindness that can last up to a week or be permanent if treatment isn't got quickly?
      Anyway, awesome stuff. Thank you!

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    6. Clap = gonorrhoea or some such, certainly, Twin Two was just hurling adjectives to further frighten, and me hurling alliteration to help him do so.
      Thank you all for commenting.

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    7. This serial tale always gets me worried what is going to happen to the lead female, seems to go from the frying pan into the fire regularly, and of course well written as usual and great use of the words.

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  6. A change of focus [109]

    ‘What’s this?’ Vanessa was clearly hung over.
    ‘You tell me!’
    ‘I’m not not capable of coherent thought in the here and now, never mind the future.’
    ‘Looks like you’ve sent me a bomb!’
    ‘Use your bloody loaf, John! Why would I be posting you a letter bomb when its cheaper to simply stick it under your seat?’
    ‘Touch of self-applied brass monkeys today, is it?’
    ‘What? I’m deaf, dumb and blind? Or you think I’ve got balls?’
    ‘Oh Vanessa, you certainly have balls! Question is, what poor sod did you cheat into handing his over?’
    ‘None of your bloody business!’

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    1. Nice self-contained story with a touch of humour.

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    2. Ah, domestic bliss ...

      (Nice dialogue!)

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    3. You think she'd have seen that trick question coming, since it's classic police work. This so needs to be a black and white web series. I think it would go viral in an instant.

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    4. Vanessa is her usual sharp self, almost biting in this episode! More needed...

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    5. Lol really enjoyed the second to last line, I think I know some ladies like that.

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  8. Who Cares?

    The cat loafed on the stone, soaking up the harsh sun’s heat. Its black scabrous tail flicked the brass filigree still visible on the coffin side, caring not for the occupant who thought he could cheat death.

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    1. Slick take on the prompts, and a very clear, effective image. Nice!

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    2. A wicked little vignette, and so very cat-like!

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    3. Sharply observed, good use of the prompts!

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    4. Lovely use of loaf especially, and another neat, tight tale - perfect for a cat to be the hero of.

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  9. Ethics 1A

    When it comes to starving, and the question of dying or doing bad comes around ... there isn't much choice in that choice.

    So if a man's hunger hangs some brass bollocks on him, and he light-fingers a loaf, what then? Maybe he finds he's good at it? His definition of dire need soon grows a little fuzzy, perhaps.

    And now, stay with me, what if, after he's eaten all the bread, his hunger takes a turn, and it's pussy he's after? Should a man cheat his lover's husband, if it's to feed his starving prick?

    Mr. Glock says, "no."

    Bastard.

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    1. So clever, this. An entertaining moral tale with a kick in the end. Good to see you here again Chris.

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    2. I love how this ends - justification of dark deeds run full stop into determined obstruction.

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    3. loved this, cleverly done. And welcome back, you've been missed!

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    4. Thanks RR and Antonia. Glad to be back and mucking about with my digital pen. :)

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    5. Good. Love the unusual style, the justifications and the twist.

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  10. Infinity 78.

    I must dispose of the Creature, if I can. It be a burden I carry and I dislike that. I want to cheat it somehow but that be difficult. The sun be bright today, brassy bright, I dislike that and while I be complaining, the loaf the cook sent up were hard. Ah me, tis a right contrary life at times, being Cap’n of the Infinity.
    But then the call came, ‘sail ahoy!’. We rushed to the sides to see what lookout spied for us. A merchantman, be damned, riding low, water slopping the gunnels, she’s got to be loaded.

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    1. Oh GOOD - Captain's getting back to a bit of piracy. That should set him up more strongly.

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    2. Another nice continuation of the serial? Looking forward to reading it in its entirety. The three words fit in so well.

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    3. Always enjoy seeing how you work the words into your tale especially with the few ongoing tales we have on here, great work.

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  11. Feels like I've been away for years, but good old fashioned work and family commitments have got in the way of late, so it's good to be back among familiar friends.

    Famished

    Natalya rubbed the battered brass pot and watched her distorted, tarnished reflection.

    Her mother picked at a stale loaf, their only remaining sustenance, and rubbed her weary face.

    Low light dulled the surrounds, despite the deep pristine snow that enveloped the tiny wooden hut.

    She looked up.

    He was still there. Her father. Slumped in the snow, half covered by fresh layers. He’d been there four days.

    Unlike the other villagers who had succumbed, Natalya knew they would cheat the winter famine, thanks to her father.

    ‘The bread is all gone now, Mama,’ she said. ‘It’s time to cook Papa.’

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    1. liked that one! Even with the signalled ending, it was still a perfectly rounded piece!

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    2. Good and gruesome - maybe 'starving' should be the title as I don't know if Papa would be on the menu if they were only famished? It is a good complete tale.

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  12. I knew that end was coming. Knew it, but loved it just the same. Chilling slice of life here!

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  13. The gates are closed, m'dears. I shall have winners and words up this afternoon, as I'm going to be away for the rest of the weekend!

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  14. Colleen has asked me to let you know that her internet is being recalcitrant. She isn't ignoring you! She will make another attempt to post winners and words this afternoon. If she can't make it, I will do the honors.

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  15. Do we get a week off???? the captain is anxious to continue his story, though...

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  16. checking up on you guys, are you snowed under/in? Gone fishing? Enjoying Thanksgiving a tad too much... (LOL) hope you are OK. missing you both.

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