Saturday, 14 June 2014

A Summer of Horrors

Good morning all,

The tome and I are awake and have decided to get on the ball early today.

As we get further into summer, I find myself more and more inspired to write, and to find new horrors to explore.  Summer is outside time, and it has always been my habit to read a good horror story, sitting on my porch, late at night, with naught but the dim porch light.  It's spooky and peaceful all at the same time.  I look forward to a summer filled with terrible delights from all of you!

And now, as this morning's tarot counseled expediency and progress, I'm going to get right on with winners and words.

This week's winner is Zaiure with Gestation:  Everything about this is visceral, horrible, and wonderful.  The final line, delivered so casually is positively chilling.  Thank you!

I also wish to honor William Davoll's Make No Bones:  As an middle aged gal who has a tendency to enjoy the company of younger men, this story gave me just a bit of pause!  It's tightly written and I love the very businesslike tone of the whole thing.  And "Cougar Surprise" just made me laugh, albeit a bit fearfully.  Thank you!

And now the Tome has brought forth new words, thanks to a few scritches along the spine.

Faithless
Distortion
Revolt

The usual rules apply: 100 words maximum (excluding title) of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy, science fiction or noir. All variants and use of the words and stems are fine. You have until Friday evening, June 20.

Feel free to post links to your stories on Twitter or Facebook or whichever social media best pleases you and, if you like, remind your friends that we are open to new and returning writers.

The Gates Are Open!


27 comments:

  1. Congratulations Zaiure, for a well deserved win with a chest puncher of a tale. Thank you Colleen for the honorable mention. I've missed taking part, hopefully work will be kind enough to allow me time to take part again with this weeks fine words. For now it's back to the kitchen to whip up something new. [laughs a little too loud with an uncomfortable overtone]

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    1. Oh wow, thanks so much! And congrats to you William. :) Much deserved for sure!

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  3. Hopefully got it right this time

    Too Close For Comfort
    My Mother had always been a lady, but rapid onset dementia set her on a path of mental distortion. The drugs she took to maintain her sensibilities soon untied the knot on her longevity, her fastidious nature changing to habits to cause revolt.
    On the moment of her passing she sat bolt upright fixing me with her gaze, screaming “They’re coming for the faithless like you, you’ll see!” With that she passed away.
    At her burial, next to her grave was a black shadow of me, beckoning. No one else could see it. I knew then that I'm next!

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    1. Congratulations Zaiure! wonderful writing and congratulations, William, another worthy of praise.
      As is this vignette, saying so much! Good one!

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    2. Too close to the bone to read with anything other than horror, and that before we reach the shadow!

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    3. That last paragraph gave me goosebumps - haunting stuff !

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    4. Oh, we haven't had a good death portent around here in a long time! Well done.

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  4. Congratulations Zaiure - always so original and entertaining - and well done William.

    Dawn chorus

    I only wanted his babies; any other man would see me in revolt. A show of maternity might tempt him since such distortion of my physical charms as he had seen, having spread me asunder in childbirth, watched me bleed, would hardly suffice as seduction.

    Before dawn the child awoke and cried. I reached for it and put it to my breast, but he arose, stepped out for a pee, his murmur to the horse more tender than his subsequent words to me; his faithlessness in my mothering skills all too evident when he lifted the child and walked away.

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    1. This really grabbed me - I've so many questions about this woman and her partner, and about their relationship. Wonderful.

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    2. This is a story that has volume, in that depending on the viewpoint from which you read it yields a different story. I've read it a few times, the last time I wanted stand before him and order him to return the child to it's mother. A great Piece Sandra.

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    3. there's a richness and depth to this ongoing saga that is hard to write and wonderful to read.

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    4. There is such a wealth of emotion in this short piece. I've read it over and over.

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  5. Decision Time

    Assembled from salvaged and stolen parts, the wireless was an ugly and fragile thing. For the faithless in Sector L7 it was the only connection to their comrades in the continuing war against the brutal theocratic regime.
    Numan twisted the dials, his grimy oil-stained hands moving quickly as he tried to find the signal among the crackling pulses of interference.
    'Anything? Have they sent instructions?' asked Meadows.
    ‘There’s too much distortion,’ replied Numan, shaking his head.
    Meadows ran a hand through his beard, thinking. ‘They’ve already found one weapon cache. Time is running out. Do we revolt now, or wait?’

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    1. There's something very enticing about 'ugly and fragile' and the 'grimy oil-stained hands. This is such a vivid scene, so simply set.

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    2. I love the words you have chosen to describe the wireless they serve to set the scene with imagery that's between the lines, also love the cliff hanger ending. Yes I want more.

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    3. this is being read on a week when we had a very old radio dropped in at the shop, from the late 40s, it lit up but the static was unbelievable. I thought of it the moment I read this... not that this would have been on a spaceship but you know what I mean... it conjured pictures, which is always good.

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    4. I am impressed by the world building you've done! I want to know the answer, how the revolt will go, who the players are. The most frightening thing about this scenario is how easily it could come to pass.

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  7. A change of focus [89]

    Ben Brickwood, amused: ‘So, Faith was faithless, Charity, from what you say, a bible-bashing anything but, and Hope? I can’t begin to guess how she subverted the implication of her name.’

    Pettinger, soberly, ‘Faith put hers in men’s willingness to pay for what women will provide for free in friendly circumstances. Charity better-adhered to the precepts of her surname – Cherrystone – but Hope... Hope was pessimism personified. Perfectionist. Became a social worker. Had the highest rate of re-housed children – dragged screaming from their far-from-inadequate parents – anywhere in the country. Just last week, they revolted. Sacked her. Presumably she returned. To imperfection.’

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    1. The subtext in this is frightening in such a believable way. There's almost as much not said as spoken.

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  8. I really enjoyed witty weaved plot line.

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    1. That dialogue, so broken up, so emphatic, said the whole thing in a precise and chilling way.

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  9. the lonely haunting cries of seagulls accompanied the Captain's visit here tonight to give me the next instalment of Infinity. Hope it works.

    Infinity 58
    I feared a revolt when ‘land ahoy’ was called but the crew stayed calm and waited until the shoreline were proper in view. Green, it were, lush and rich and multi-coloured everywhere. Not seen this place afore. I let First Mate take the boat ashore, saw one of the shadows climb aboard, they would find nothing much to see, a little distortion, perhaps. They be a faithless bunch, tell them the shadows were there, they were as likely to spit over the side and walk off.
    For a time there be peace on board and peace in my heart.

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    1. And how well you've evoked that period of well-deserved and long-overdue peace for the Captain, but is that due to the absence of the shadows or his non-provoking crew?

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    2. He needed those moments of peace, and I felt a sense of great relief that he found them, even at the expense of keeping his crew unaware of the shadows amongst them.

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  10. What a great bunch of stories! I will be back tomorrow morning to comment and post winners and words. The gates are now closed.

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